WTI GRADUATE SCHOOL
 

Weber Rolf H.



Prof. Rolf H. Weber
rolf.weber@rwi.unizh.ch
++41 (44) 634 48 84
  • Civil, Commercial and European Law
  • Internet, Media and Competition Law
  • International Finance and Trade Regulation

Rolf H. Weber is a Professor for Civil, Commercial and European Law at the University of Zurich Law School in Switzerland. He studied at the University of Zurich where he was admitted as attorney, wrote his doctoral thesis and obtained his doctor degree in 1979.

1980/81 he was a visiting scholar at the Harvard Law School, upon his return he worked as an attorney-at-law and lecturer at the University of St. Gallen and Berne, while he finished his habilitation. Since 1995 he has been a professor at the University of Zurich and a visiting professor at the University of Hong Kong, teaching and publishing in civil, commercial and European law with special topics in Internet, media and competition law, international finance and trade regulation.
Further, he is director of the European Law Institute and the Center for Information and Communication Law at the University of Zurich as well as a member of the directory of the Postgraduate Studies in International Business Law at the University of Zurich and delegate for international relations of the Law Faculty of the University of Zurich.

Since 2008 Prof. Dr. Rolf H. Weber is a member of the Steering Committee of the Global Internet Governance Academic Network (GigaNet) as well as a member of the European Dialogue on Internet Governance (EuroDIG). Since 2009 he has been member of the High-level Panel of Advisers of the Global Alliance for Information and Communication Technologies and Development (GAID).
In addition he is engaged as an attorney-at-law and as a member of the editorial board of several Swiss and international legal periodicals. He is a member of the panelists of the WTO and participates as judge in ELSA moot court on WTO law on a regular basis.

In the year 2008, he joined a research group from NCCR Trade and Finance to investigate the impact of liberalised financial services.